Home Forums Support, Technical Issues and Suggestions Suggestion: Game engines list

This topic contains 6 replies, has 7 voices, and was last updated by Profile photo of Tushant Mirchandani Tushant Mirchandani 3 years, 3 months ago.

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  • #1051
    Profile photo of darkshade2095
    darkshade2095
    Participant

    I’ve seen the game engine part on the resources list.
    But maybe we need a more comprehensible list of game engines (that are free to use), like Unity 5, Unreal engine 4, source engine 2, RPG maker etc.
    Maybe some people can pitch in on what are the strengths and weaknesses of these engines.

    It might help starting indies/hobbyist pick the right engine for their game.

    I am a starting hobbyist so i just picked Unity because i thought it had the most tutorials for it.

  • #1119
    Profile photo of Frank-Erik
    Frank-Erik
    Participant

    It’s worth mentioning; for those individuals who are looking to do professional work on games, picking an engine is akin to leveling up a skill in [generic RPG]. The more work you put into one engine, the better you will be with it. Previous experience on engines have proven to generate greater success on a game, so if one tries to get a job as a developer it is important to take stock in fundamental skills. Limiting yourself to one engine could easily exclude yourself from a lot of job offers.

    As a hobbyist it’s all about picking something you enjoy working with. Professionally you need to be more strategic.

    Right now is a good time as CryEngine, Unity 3D and Unreal are all in sharp competition and with some hopefuls on the way.

    From what I hear, I’m a designer so take my word with a grain of salt, CryEngine has had some major issues with it’s code, but looks absolutely stunning if you have 3D-models made by really great artisans. But it’s graphics aside, if you don’t have that you have to weigh it on other merits. My experience with it is limited.

    Unity 3D, a fan favorite and where I programmed my first game, while nothing spectacular, a fun experience and easy to pick up with a literal Spintires truckload worth of tutorials and a supportive community. Supports UnityScript (Essentially Java), Boo and C#. Unity3D v5 was recently released.

    Unreal Engine uses UnrealScript which is similar to Java, apparently, but some critical differences. It has the benefit of being free with a revenue up to 3000 USD every quarter, which is an interesting push against the recent release against the Unity3D release earlier this month. They also officially support moving over from Unity3D to Unreal, I believe. https://docs.unrealengine.com/latest/INT/GettingStarted/FromUnity/index.html?utm_source=uelauncher&utm_medium=software&utm_campaign=learntab

    But for the most part I cannot help too much since code isn’t my greatest asset. Although, some help however little.

    • #1123
      Profile photo of Vijaysrinivas
      Vijaysrinivas
      Participant

      Unreal Engine uses UnrealScript which is similar to Java, apparently, but some critical differences. It has the benefit of being free with a revenue up to 3000 USD every quarter, which is an interesting push against the recent release against the Unity3D release earlier this month.

      UnrealScript is based off of C++ rather than Java, but they all are types of OOP langauges. As for the change in payment, in my opinion, it was more unexpected than interesting. The same monetary deal was made in UDK, a free development suite based on Unreal Engine 3. Although, UE4 is far more expansive, better documentation, and actually gives you the source code of engine, opposed to UE3 which, if my memory serves correctly, does not.

      Quick note, UnrealScript has been abandoned for raw C++ and Blueprint design in UE4.

      • This reply was modified 3 years, 9 months ago by Profile photo of Vijaysrinivas Vijaysrinivas.
  • #1147
    Profile photo of skycardboard
    skycardboard
    Participant

    Here’s a decent, already existing resource for people to collaborate on listing recommended things and putting forward pros and cons: Slant.co. Unfortunately the forum won’t let me post links… I tried to post the 2D game engine list.

    ETA: check the Game Development tag, naturally.

    • This reply was modified 3 years, 9 months ago by Profile photo of skycardboard skycardboard.
  • #1150
    Profile photo of Jennifer D'aww
    Jennifer D’aww
    Keymaster

    Pixel Prospector has a great list, we’re trying not to mimic how they did it exactly and try another approach but we will be filling out more as we go http://www.pixelprospector.com/the-big-list-of-game-making-tools/

  • #2012
    Profile photo of Tamachan87
    Tamachan87
    Participant

    Cocos2D is an open source game engine. I know a lot of Japanese companies like to make mobile apps using this engine, like Bandai and Square Enix.

  • #2879
    Profile photo of Tushant Mirchandani
    Tushant Mirchandani
    Participant

    There are two more game engines I’d like to recommend here.

    The first being GDevelop by CompilGames, which is somewhat along the lines of Construct, but isn’t exactly a clone. Coding isn’t required to build a game with it from scratch, but like all good things it needs “visual coding”.

    The second being OpenBOR (which will eventually be superceded by the upcoming engine “Chrono Crash”). This is probably THE best Beat-em-up building engine around, allowing you to quickly create beat-em-up games from scratch or available resources. The sad part is that, even though coding / scripting isn’t required, there is no visual editor for this (except unofficial ones in the same forums) and you’ll have to dig into the text-based parametric approach to making your games. Scripting is available if you want to expand your game’s functionality beyond the parameters available.

    I would also like to add in Synfig for 2D animations, in case anybody needs it.

    (Also, off-topic, but also add in Google Fonts in the Fonts section of the website.)

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